Colour Coded Webbing Slings

One of the products that we stock at Rope Services Direct, webbing slings, is universally colour coded so that everyone from manufacturers to end-users know exactly what their webbing slings are capable of. To help explain the colour coded webbing slings system in more detail, we have written the following article for you.

What is the colour coded webbing slings system?

Before we explain the colour coding system in more detail, first here are the colour codes used for webbing slings:

 

–          Purple webbing slings = maximum safe lifting weight of one tonne

–          Green webbing slings = maximum safe lifting weight of two tonnes

–          Yellow webbing slings = maximum safe lifting weight of three tonnes

–          Grey webbing slings = maximum safe lifting weight of four tonnes

–          Red webbing slings = maximum safe lifting weight of five tonnes

–          Brown webbing slings = maximum safe lifting weight of six tonnes

–          Blue webbing slings = maximum safe lifting weight of eight tonnes

–          Orange webbing slings = maximum safe lifting weight of ten tonnes

All lifting equipment, whether it is webbing slings, wire rope, or something else entirely, will have a working load limit and a safe working load. The working load limit is the tested limit of a piece of lifting equipment, and is the maximum amount that it can lift. Any more than this and it will break.

colour coded webbing slings

Here you can see some of the various colours of webbing sling that we stock

The safe working load is the limit that has put in place by manufacturers, and is what you should stick to at all times to ensure the longevity of your lifting equipment. The colour coding system above represents the safe working load of the different types of webbing slings.

Why do webbing slings need a colour coding system?

There are strict rules and regulations in place in the lifting equipment and lifting operations industry that affect the way equipment is used and the equipment itself. The most commonly referred to regulation for this is the Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998 (LOLER), which states that all lifting equipment must be appropriately marked.

While it doesn’t specifically state that webbing slings need a colour coding system, this colour coding system falls into the safe markings laid out in LOLER.

Things to consider with webbing slings

The webbing slings that you purchase and use are colour coded for a reason. Never try and lift more than the weight that your webbing sling has been designated as handling, otherwise  you could run the risk of causing harm to yourself or those around you.

Webbing slings are not the strongest pieces of lifting equipment either. They are generally purchased for their flexibility, adaptability and portability. If you are looking for lifting equipment that can handle heavier loads, then we recommend using something such as wire rope instead.

Want more information on webbing slings?

If you want to know more about webbing slings, the colour coded webbing slings system or how you can get the most out of your lifting equipment, then we would be happy to share our knowledge. You can get in contact with us here.